Bookends

The 1940s Look £16.99

Looking your best during the Second World War must have been a challenge. Clothes were rationed so clothing factories could switch to war work.

 

Families were encouraged to use second-hand clothes, with children's clothing handed down from one child to the next and even sold on to other families.

The slogan Make Do And Mend came about because the government wanted to encourage families to recycle, repair and patch up old clothes.

 

Using government advice and illustrations, The 1940s Look tells you how men, women and children dressed during that period. 

 

www.iwmshop.org.uk

Forties Fashion

Fans of the 1940s will really enjoy reading Forties Fashion. In his book Jonathan Walford uses 250 illustrations, period advertisements and images of real clothes as well as first-hand accounts from contemporary publications.

 

Also featured is the creation of Christian Dior's New Look, which was launched in Febuary 1947.

The Dior client list ran from Ava Gardner, Marlene Dietrich and Rita Hayworth, who wore one of his evening gowns to the premiere of her new movie Gilda.

 

This book will be very handy for reference if your attending a Forties event or you like to wear 1940s fashion.

 

www.iwmshop.org.uk

Design Museum: Fifty Dresses That Changed The World

Every iconic dress and outfit dating back to the 1915 Delphos Pleated dress is featured in this book. From Marilyn Monroe’s halter-neck dress as seen in the infamous scene from The Seven Year Itch, to Audrey Hepburn’s Givenchy little black dress from Breakfast at Tiffany’s this book has it all.

 

There’s background information but let’s be honest; it’s the outfits that we really want to see (well I do anyway). So I’m happy to say that there are plenty of fabulous photos for you to look at.

 

I’ll just leave you with this quote from Coco Chanel,

 

"Fashion fades, only style remains the same."

 

Also available in this series: Fifty Shoes


www.octopusbooks.co.uk

 

Make Do And Mend

Short film from the collections of the Imperial War Museum "How to make-do-and-mend exhibition